hide

Read Next

Balancing Act

I've been thinking a lot about balance lately. I keep catching myself treating it like a state, a way that things can be: "Everything is in balance." It's an alluring fantasy, especially when I'm stressed because I can look forward to some future where I've done all the work and things are in balance and the stress is all gone.

Except in the real, dynamic world, balance doesn't work that way. Balance is not a state of being. Balance is an activity. When you walk on a tightrope, you are never balanced; you are always balancing.

Maybe this seems obvious to you, intellectually, like saying "life's a journey, not a destination." But I always catch myself treating balance like it's a state, and I bet you do, too.

What motivates your actions? When something seems out of balance, and you are working to change it, is your motivation the underlying itch of "Just this last thing..."? I do this all the time. At work I'll see a situation that is on fire and I'll start working to put that fire out. Nothing wrong with that. But if I meditate a little bit to really see my underlying feelings, I see impatience, aggravation, and a sense of reaching, stretching out and grasping at some imaginary future where this fire is out and I can finally rest. Deep down there's a part of me that is looking forward to everything being balanced so I can take a deep breath and exhale and all the tension will leave my body and I'll finally be at peace.

The Oscillating Nature Of Consciousness

On Cameron Chardukian

Good people make bad decisions. Why? Because even “good people” aren’t always operating at a high level of consciousness.

Similar to our mood, our consciousness is constantly oscillating between higher and lower level frequencies. Highly conscious people may spend more time at higher levels of consciousness, and have a higher range of consciousness, but they’re also going to spend some time in lower levels of consciousness occasionally.

On an average week I may only spend an hour randomly wasting time on the internet, but when I’m at my worst I may spend 10 hours in a single day wasting time. Similarly, someone who’s riding a high streak of consciousness may eat a completely clean diet, but if they’re going through a tough time that same person may eat a diet consisting of almost entirely junk food.

99% of the time I may take positive actions, but because of the oscillating nature of consciousness I’m going to make poor decisions that are completely uncharacteristic of me 1% of the time. The key is to be aware that you’re going to be susceptible to making poor decisions and prepare yourself for those situations.

Rendering New Theme...